Scientific Search Engines

Why Use Scientific Search Engines?

Search engines are all different in the Web sites they cover, and the way they classify these Web sites. The search engines for science, focuses only on Web pages containing scientific contents, helps you quickly locate scientific information on the Web:

  • Filters out non-scientific sites.
  • Finds peer-reviewed articles such as PDF and PostScript files, which are often invisible to other search engines.
  • Searches the most comprehensive combination of web information, preprint servers, digital archives, repositories and patent and journal databases.

Google Scholar enables you to search specifically for scholarly literature, including peer-reviewed papers, theses, books, preprints, abstracts and technical reports from all broad areas of research. Use Google Scholar to find articles from a wide variety of academic publishers, professional societies, preprint repositories and universities, as well as scholarly articles available across the web.

Google Scholar Search Engine

ScienceResearch.com is a free, publicly available deep web search engine that uses advanced “federated search technology” to return high quality results by submitting your search query – in real-time – to other well respected search engines then collating, ranking and dropping duplicates of the results.

ScienceResearch.com

WorldWideScience.org is a global science gateway comprised of national and international scientific databases and portals. WorldWideScience.org accelerates scientific discovery and progress by providing one-stop searching of databases from around the world (Architecture: What is under the Hood). Multilingual WorldWideScience.org provides real-time searching and translation of globally-dispersed multilingual scientific literature.

WorldWideScience.Org

BASE (Bielefeld Academic Search Engine) is a multi-disciplinary search engine to scholarly internet resources, created by Bielefeld University Library in Bielefeld, Germany.

BASE search